WHS senior project standouts

Meghan+Kobrin%27s+senior+project+

Photo by Meghan Kobrin

Meghan Kobrin's senior project

Meghan Kobrin

Senior Meghan Kobrin used her creative mindset and interest in beauty products to establish her own line of skin care products. Kobrin is making her own items such as lotion, body scrub and lip balm, along with being a pioneer for her own brand- MK Skin Care. “Not only did I want to learn about the benefits of all-natural ingredients and how to make these products,” Kobrin said, “but I wanted to focus on the marketing end too by designing my own logo and brand.” Kobrin’s main objective was to establish products with the most natural ingredients so people understand that they are using only organic preservatives.

by Sierra Byrne

Ethan Hom 

For Ethan Hom, it’s all about environmental protection and conservation. Hom’s project is a self-sufficient, indoor, miniature farm called a hydroponics garden. A hydroponics grow system allows for efficient plant growth via a concentrated and diluted nutrient solution as opposed to soil. Hom created his own system within his home. Hom said that he’s “always been interested in environmental sustainability and it seemed like with hydroponics you can grow a large volume of plants with a lot less space and water wasted.” With his project, Hom strives to take one step further towards finding a way to prevent damage to the environment.

by Viggo Jabon

Briana Brown 

Briana Brown’s passion for art and drive for racial tolerance inspired her project, a mural teaching racial equality. A survey conducted in her sociology class asking students if they’ve noticed the lack of racial diversity at WHS sparked Brown’s interest in dedicating her senior project to appreciating different cultures. “My mural depicts a book with two hands coming out from the top, a black hand and a white hand, and it represents them uniting,” said Brown. “Especially with this school being predominantly white, I wanted there to be a message of celebrating racial diversity of everyone’s cultures.”

by Jackie LaMastra

Lily Maz 

Inspired by a computer science class, Lily Maz decided to create her own video game. With limited knowledge about the subject, she combined the skills she learned from the class with the steps of a YouTube tutorial to build her virtual game. The premise is to maneuver a cube around obstacles that she designed using software. “The biggest challenges with making my video game were that it took an extensive amount of time and energy and it was pretty frustrating at first learning how to navigate everything on the software,” said Maz. “I eventually got the hang of it, but it definitely took time and a lot of patience at the start.”

by Caroline Dwyer